Thomas Tuchel: Klopp 2.0 or Pep 2.0?

FRANKFURT AM MAIN, GERMANY - APRIL 05:  Head coach Thomas Tuchel of Mainz looks on prior to the Bundesliga match between Eintracht Frankfurt and 1. FSV Mainz 05 at Commerzbank Arena on April 5, 2014 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.  (Photo by Alex Grimm/Bongarts/Getty Images)
FRANKFURT AM MAIN, GERMANY – APRIL 05: Head coach Thomas Tuchel of Mainz looks on prior to the Bundesliga match between Eintracht Frankfurt and 1. FSV Mainz 05 at Commerzbank Arena on April 5, 2014 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Bongarts/Getty Images)

People always expect great players to become great managers, although it is known that this is not often the case. In that respect, probably even Thomas Tuchel himself never saw himself becoming a coach, let alone one of the most talented managers in Germany.

His first football move from his youth club TSV Krumbach was to FC Augsburg in 1988, a fourth-tier club at the time. After four years spent in Augsburg, he played for Stuttgarter Kickers and SSV Ulm, second and third-tiers respectively. He played 77 senior matches as a defender, scoring three goals, before retiring at the age of 25, due to a chronic cartilage injury.

This rather unsuccessful attempt at a career in playing football did not discourage Tuchel from trying to establish his name in the footballing world. In 2000, he became VfB Stuttgart’s U19 manager. He spent five years there before returning to his old club FC Augsburg. In 2009, Tuchel was appointed a new manager of 1. FSV Mainz 05, having previously spent two years in the club as the U19 coach. He was at the helm of the club for five years, before a mutual termination of contract in 2014. He brought daring, attacking football to the club and finished his tenure with a 39.56% win rate, which is a very respectable number, considering he inherited a newly-promoted team. His most successful season was 2010/11, when his team finished fifth, 11 points ahead of sixth-placed Nurnberg. He started off the campaign that year with seven straight wins, including an away victory against Bayern Munich.

Tuchel names Hermann Badstuber, his mentor during his time at Stuttgart, as his greatest influence. “I’ve never known a coach that’s had so much expert knowledge while being such a creative thinker, to question himself so much, work so hard and yet remain so modest. He was a massive influence both personally and professionally. He became like a sporting father figure to me.”, said Tuchel about his tutor.

The first thing Tuchel worked on with his new squad was team spirit. He noticed that there was no cohesion in the team. He changed that not through strictness and a thorough control of schedule, but through motivation and the gradual development of team unity. In the season 2011/12, the team started off badly, with two losses in the league and an unexpected early exit from the Europa League (they lost to Romanian club GazMetan in the third qualifying round). He gave a motivational speech, where he even quoted Michael Jordan and made a team that lacked morale go onto the pitch and win the next game.

The main thing about Tuchel’s tactics is the high pressing, similar to the way the Klopp’s squad played when they reached the Champions League final. As soon as Thuchel’s team lost the ball they worked on regaining it. Instead of running back and taking defensive positions, they tackled hard up on the pitch, without allowing the opposition to steadily develop their attack. But, when the quick pressing failed, they relied on a well-organized defense.

On the ball, they played direct football with as much work done as in defending. Tuchel introduced differently shaped pitches on the training ground – they were not rectangular, but in the shape of a diamond or  circle. Different shapes restricted the players from long passes on the flank, where a winger would make a run for it, but rather made them play directly, organizing their attacks with quick-paced forwards who would create space.

His preferred formation was a narrow 4-3-1-2 structure, which gave him the opportunity to control the center of the pitch. The formation, however, would leave the team vulnerable to the attacks through the flanks, which he solved by defensive midfielders covering opposing fullbacks, and the attacking midfielder pressing the opponent’s defensive midfield players.

Although he had his preferred formation, he was known for adjusting the tactics and the starting eleven to the opposition. He would often change his formation and leave his best players on the bench, which kept his opponents guessing on the way he might play. This was best illustrated against Bayern Munich. He fielded a 4-1-4-1 formation against Van Gaal’s 4-3-3 and won 2:1, and against Heynckes’ side he was victorious with a 4-3-2-1 shape. The way he dealt with the opposition fullbacks greatly affected the outcome of the matches. He limited their space which caused them to have less passing options, which in turn caused the other players to drop deeper for the ball and be constrained in a narrow part of the pitch.

You can read about Tuchel’s setup in the Bayern game in more detail here. 

DORTMUND, GERMANY - APRIL 20: Head coach Thomas Tuchel of Mainz looks on next to Juergen Klopp, head coach of Dortmund, during the Bundesliga match between Borussia Dortmund and 1. FSV Mainz 05 at Signal Iduna Park on April 20, 2013 in Dortmund, Germany.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Bongarts/Getty Images)
DORTMUND, GERMANY – APRIL 20: Head coach Thomas Tuchel of Mainz looks on next to Juergen Klopp, head coach of Dortmund, during the Bundesliga match between Borussia Dortmund and 1. FSV Mainz 05 at Signal Iduna Park on April 20, 2013 in Dortmund, Germany. (Photo by Lars Baron/Bongarts/Getty Images)

Though Tuchel himself said that Guardiola’s work at Barcelona influenced him more, there are a lot of similarities in his and Jurgen Klopp’s careers and the way they see the game. First of all, they were both defenders, although Klopp had a lengthier playing career. They both made names for themselves at Mainz, and now Tuchel will replace Klopp at Borussia Dortmund.

They both appreciate attacking football, with pacey forwards, high tempo and high pressure. They are both the type of manager who likes not only to win, but to win in style. Both approach their jobs as fans, asking their players to play attractive, passionate football. As it’s almost becoming a pattern, if you want to a bet on who is going to be Tuchel’s successor at Borussia, just take a look who is doing well at Mainz.

Tuchel faces a difficult task of replacing the fans’ favorite and one of the most charismatic and respected managers in Klopp, and, if the transfer rumors are to be believed, he will also have to work on rebuilding the team, already in decline as it is. In the next few years, he will show whether he is up to it or not.

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  1. I never liked soccer until my boy serattd playing it. Now that he is getting pretty good, I like it more.The sport gets a bad rap. Check out the English Premier games sometimes on cable. Even the NCAA tournament games this year were pretty damn entertaining, including the women’s bracket.Played a ton of (street) hockey as a kid, including in a pretty serious league, and always loved the Flyers, especially in the 70’s. Stopped watching the Flyers when Bob Clarke treated an injured Eric Lindros like a stray dog. Never came back; don’t miss the game. I catch a few minutes from time to time and based on those brief glimpses, it’s obvious what is wrong with the game. The ice surface isn’t large enough for today’s bigger and faster players. It’s taken the skill out of the game.Basketball is another sport that has tanked in my opinion. I blame the fall on Sportscenter. Everybody wants to dunk and pose. If you want to watch the game played right (Larry Brown reference), you need to watch a high school game. High school basketball is still awesome.With apologies to the fine folks here, pro football has also taken a major step back for me. The product is fine, but the incessant TV time outs are killing the game. It’s actually become comical.Here’s how I rank the major sports right now in terms of entertainment:1. Baseball2. Football3. Soccer4. Golf5. Boxing 6. Basketball7. Hockey8. Tennis9. NASCAR Anyone else?(I still won’t watch mixed martial arts)Ed Wade

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